General News

How to Get Financially Fit

With many money management resources at your fingertips, it can be easier than you think to teach your high school students how keep their personal finances in order. To become financially fit means for students to use their money wisely and to make conscious and informed decisions with their savings and spending.

First, many accessible online resources cHow to Get Financially Fit 208x300 How to Get Financially Fitan help them create a budget that’s best for them and can help make it easier to stay on track with printables, apps, and email reminders. With the advent of banking and saving apps for smartphones, it’s now easier than ever for students with bank accounts to put away a small chunk into savings each time they get paid, which is important because you never know when an emergency will occur. Remind students to never forgo reading the fine print on any banking card options to avoid extra debit and credit card expenses like ATM fees, overdraft fees, or annual fees on top of the charges they already pay. Additionally, take advantage of the free online credit reports per bureau each year as your older student’s annual financial checkup to see if their credit is up to par so they can work on repairing it, if necessary.

The bottom line is that healthy finances can be easily achieved but not by accident. Online or offline, financial planning can work for your high school students now and in the future if you remind them to take mindful precautions and make thoughtful decisions with their money. Students will thank themselves for the time they spend planning because it is definitely worth the benefits of being financially fit for life.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 24, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE in the News: Lessons in Personal Finance “Compound Just Like Interest”

In a recent article, Cincinnati parents and educators discuss the need for financial education in schools. One elementary school teacher, employs free lessons from the Council for Economic Education to use with her students. According to the article, personal finance and economics educators say the messages learned from such lessons “compound just like interest and experiential learning is more likely to last.”
 

POSTED: June 10, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: ,

The Hidden Costs of College

Hidden Costs of College 714x1024 The Hidden Costs of CollegeCollege seems to have many costs everyone forgets to mention, especially at orientation. Going in, everyone has ideas what their four years will cost: tuition, room and board, and money for other essentials. Now add the fees for that prestigious fraternity/sorority that you have been eying, paying for plane tickets and everything else when you take a summer or semester abroad, and finding some fantastic internship where you realize what it is that you are going to do (or not do) with your life, which is also usually unpaid. On top of this, there’s the possibility of extra semesters because remediation, a failed class, switch of majors, or transfers and there are even costs for graduating. All this isn’t to say that college is expensive so you should skip out on it, as college graduates with a Bachelor’s Degree earn on average $800,000 more in a lifetime compared to those who don’t have degrees. This is here, however, to open your eyes to the potential costs that lay ahead of you. Hopefully this list will help you plan so you can do all that you desire to do and come out with a degree in hand, a couple years of great memories, and a little less debt.

Written by Fisher Derderian, a rising junior at The King’s College in downtown Manhattan studying Politics, Philosophy, and Economics. He is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 5, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Economic Outlook from the Boardroom – Perspectives from Women of the Board

On May 13, CEE held another exciting discussion in the Vantage Point series, covering the Economic Outlook from the Boardroom: Perspectives from Women of the Board. Held over breakfast at the Harvard Club of New York, an esteemed panel of leaders shared their insight and their own personal experience while discussing the challenges of women in the boardroom and beyond.

CEE’s CEO and President Nan J. Morrison opened the program, while Ellen Hughes-Cromwick, Director and Chief Economist of the Ford Motor Company, moderated the panel.

WomensBreakfast 300x225 Economic Outlook from the Boardroom   Perspectives from Women of the Board

From Left to Right: Ellen Hughes-Cromwick, Mellody Hobson, Mary Schapiro, Nan Morrison, and Cathy Minehan.

The Hon. Mary Schapiro, 29th Chairman of the SEC, Former Chairman and CEO of FINRA, and a 2008 CEE Visionary Award winner, presented first, noting that only 18% of corporate board seats are held by women—and yet, when women make up a larger percentage of a board, it’s more likely to see a higher return on capital and sales.

Mellody Hobson, President of Ariel Investments, followed up by addressing the importance of both gender and racial diversity, and how it creates real value for companies.

Rounding out the panel, Ms. Cathy Minehan discussed some of the ways that gender disparity is being addressed, like the 2020 Women on Boards, an initiative to increase the percentage of women serving on corporate boards.

One of the most important initiatives to bridging the inequality gap is early financial education. And given our mission here at CEE, to promote financial and economic literacy in K-12 students, we couldn’t agree more.

POSTED: May 30, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , ,

Delaware fosters discussion on Economic and Personal Finance Education

In an effort to bring attention to the continued need for personal finance education in K-12 programming, over 80 industry, government and education leaders gathered on May 5 to discuss the state of economic and personal finance education in Delaware and how they are working together to improve the economic and financial literacy of young people.

ceee1 300x200 Delaware fosters discussion on Economic and Personal Finance Education

Delaware Govenor Jack Markell.

The program, held earlier this month at the Hotel du Pont, was the first of four regional events hosted by the national Council for Economic Education (CEE) and its local affiliate, the Delaware Council on Economic Education (DCEE), and sponsored by Capital One.

Highlighted during the event was the progress already being made through the strong partnership forged with the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship (CEEE).

“An overwhelming majority of Americans, when hit with an emergency, would have less than two weeks of reserve on which to live and a huge number of people would be out on the streets,” said Gov. Jack Markell, a longtime advocate committed to financial education, in his keynote address. “So, unfortunately, most kids don’t know about money because they’re not learning about it at home.” Read more…

POSTED: May 29, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE launches Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus

Last week on May 21, the Council for Economic Education hosted Senator Jack Reed (RI) and Senator Mike Enzi (WY) in Washington, DC for a very exciting announcement: the official launch of the Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus, a bipartisan effort to ensure that all Americans are equipped with the essential skills and education they need.

senateFEL1 300x198 CEE launches Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus

Senator Jack Reed (RI) talking with CEE CEO & President Nan Morrison (right) and RI CEE President Margaret Brooks (left).

Senator Reed stressed the importance of bringing people from all sides together to address the issue of financial literacy, “a critical problem for future generations.” Financial education is a lifelong endeavor, he continued, and “has to start in elementary and secondary schools, and lead into the college arena.”  The Caucus, he hopes, will be a “catalyst for positive change.”

Senator Enzi addressed the need for access to information and tools to help Americans make the right choices, like saving for retirement, buying insurance, or investing.

Following their remarks, the room turned its attention to an important and timely question: what role should the federal government play in supporting financial literacy? Read more…

POSTED: May 28, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , ,

Resources

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