The U.S. May Be the World’s Richest Country, But It Ranks 14th in Financial Literacy

The United States, although by many measures the world’s wealthiest country, ranks only 14th in terms of financial literacy, a survey cited in the Wall Street Journal reports.

This new financial literacy ranking comes from a survey of 150,000 adults from 148 different countries. The survey/quiz consisted of questions focused on four basic personal finance topics: inflation, interest, compounding and financial diversification.

Only 57% of Americans managed a passing grade, compared with over 70% in Norway, Denmark and Sweden and over 60% in Israel, Canada, the U.K., the Netherlands, Germany, Australia, Finland and New Zealand.

The questions in the survey were crafted to be universally applicable and have universally accepted answers, according to Annamaria Lusardi, the director of George Washington University’s financial literacy center, and a CEE board member. “One of the things that worries me is even some countries with developed economies have very low levels of financial literacy,” Ms. Lusardi said.

Read more and see who tops the U.S.

POSTED: November 25, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta

The 10th Annual Visionary Awards


Last night, the Council for Economic Education (CEE) held its 10th Annual Visionary Awards dinner hosting 300 guests at the Pierre Hotel in New York City. The evening showcased CEE’s mission, our impact to date, and honored leaders who promote economic and financial literacy. The evening was a night of thought-provoking discussion, amiable conversation, and intellectual discourse.

2015 visionary award winners with nan and steve The 10th Annual Visionary Awards

The Visionary Awards were given to four leaders who continue to advance our mission. The honorees were Ann Kaplan, Partner, Circle Wealth Management; Robert E. Moritz, U.S. Chairman and Senior Partner PwC; Prof. Robert J. Shiller, Sterling Professor of Economics, Yale University; and Andrew Ross Sorkin, Founder of DealBook, Financial Columnist for The New York Times, and CNBC Co-Anchor of “Squawk Box.”

During the evening, attendees enjoyed an entertaining fireside chat with the honorees moderated by the evening’s Master of Ceremonies and CNBC’s chief economist reporter, Steve Liesman. The fireside chat addressed hot topics such as women in the workplace, the housing “bubble,” interest rates, and most importantly, how individuals can make an impact to ensure our youth are given the opportunity to learn about economics and personal finance.

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CEE also honored three exemplary New York Metropolitan area teachers who advance economic education in and out of the classroom. The teachers received the Alfred P. Sloan Teaching Champion Awards for their excellence in economic education. They continually deliver this important content in and out of their classrooms and achieve results. 

The evening raised over $700,000 to support CEE’s programs and help us reach our goals to reach and teach every child in the United States to create a more informed citizenry capable of making better decisions as savers, investors, borrowers, voters, and participants in the global economy.

We would also like to thank those who attended and to our sponsors who helped make this amazing event happen!

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POSTED: October 30, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

Teachers and Students: Tell us ‘What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?’

CEE is excited to announce the launch of its video contest asking students in kindergarten through 12th grade for the best economic advice they can give the President of the United States. To enter the contest, record one student, or a group of students, answering the following question in 60 seconds or less:

“What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?”

Enter by Wednesday, October 7th at 11:59 p.m. Please note that teachers must enter the videos on behalf of their students. Teachers may enter more than one video per class.

Download a pdf of the rules and FAQ here. Use the hashtag #CEEVidContest to follow the contest on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Watch a video from a past CEE Video Contest Entry

 Teachers and Students: Tell us ‘What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?’


The contest is hosted on Facebook. Not all schools allow access to Facebook, so please plan accordingly by uploading your video to Facebook via a computer not associated with your school.

One winner will be chosen by CEE Facebook fans (“Viewers’ Choice”) and one winner will be chosen by economists selected as judges by CEE (“Economists’ Choice”). Prizes include a $500 American Express gift card for each teacher winner, and $25 iTunes gift cards for the student(s) featured in the winning videos.

Video Submission Period
Opens: Thursday, September 10, 2015, 9:00 a.m. ET
Closes: Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 11:59 p.m. ET

Public Voting Period
Starts: Thursday, October 8, 2015, 5:00 p.m ET
Ends: Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 p.m. ET

POSTED: September 10, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , ,

Money Math Mondays: Supply and Demand

BTM Money Math Mondays: Supply and DemandIt’s our second “Money Math Monday” and this week’s Bedtime Math problems show that demand is high for some crazy products—anyone need eyelashes for their car? Click here to see how Bedtime Math gets your kids thinking about supply and demand.



Check out these supply and demand lessons on EconEdLink.org:

econedlink logo 300x71 Money Math Mondays: Supply and Demand




Grades K-2, 3-5
To Market To Market
This lesson will help students become good consumers and producers by taking turns buying and selling things in a classroom-created market. Students will establish prices for items and observe what happens during the sale of those items.

Grades 3-5, 6-8
Not Your Grandma’s Lemonade Stand
After a review of elementary economic concepts, students will apply their understanding of supply and demand by playing an online computer game, Lemonade Stand.

Grades 6-8
Supply and Demand, Lessons from Toy Fads
The concepts of supply and demand are taught through stories about toy fads of the past, including Hula Hoops and Silly Bandz.

Grades 9-12 (Math)
Using Systems of Equations with Supply and Demand Application
Supply and demand is the meat and potatoes of all economic analysis. In this lesson, students will have the opportunity to put their Algebra 1 math skills to work in a real-world situation by mathematically determining the equilibrium price and quantity using a system of equations.

Grades 9-12 (Economics)
Would You Demand It?
How many students would demand a cell phone that costs $3,995? That was the price of the first cell phone available to the public back in 1983. Now that prices are so low, almost everyone has a cell/smart phone. In this lesson, students will learn about demand and its determinants by examining Internet subscriptions, food and the car industry.

POSTED: April 13, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta

Nancy Harrison Appointed President for Econ Illinois

nancy Nancy Harrison Appointed President for Econ Illinois Nancy Hanlon Harrison has recently been appointed the new Executive Director/President of Econ Illinois. Econ Illinois, formerly the Illinois Council for Economic Education, was founded in 1951 and has been helping integrate economic materials into curricula ever since. Nancy has served as the senior Vice President and Assistant Director of Econ Illinois since 2001 and has been actively involved in economic and entrepreneurship education throughout her career.

We are all excited to see Nancy Harrison help bring economic education to Illinois’ schools!

POSTED: October 29, 2014 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

Teach Your Child Sound Economic Principles

Selena Swartzfager hs rgb1 Teach Your Child Sound Economic PrinciplesSelena Swartzfager, leader of the Mississippi Council for Economic Education, writes an insightful article about second chances and the importance of raising your children to know sound economic principles. Swartzfager believes that no one is ever too young to become financially literate. It doesn’t matter if you’re only twelve, you can still learn about opportunity costs, the importance of savings and W-9s.

POSTED: October 21, 2014 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

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