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CEE Report – Summer 2014

Three times a year the Council for Economic Education releases the CEE Report, highlighting our new and noteworthy events, programs and partnerships, including pilot programs and joint ventures with key supporters.

download cee report su14 CEE Report   Summer 2014

In This Issue

Upcoming Events
Vantage Point Series
Note from Nan
Indiana Council Launches $mart Indiana
Financial Literacy Month Highlights
Building Economic & Financial Literacy of DE Students
Financial Literacy & the Federal Government
Building the Financial Literacy of Illinois Students
2014 National Economics ChallengeSM
53rd Annual Conference
New Board Members
Gen i Revolution – Search for the Sweet 16th Contest Results
Survey of the States – By the Numbers
2014 Visionary Awards Dinner

POSTED: June 30, 2014 | BY: kwilliams | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Get Financially Fit

With many money management resources at your fingertips, it can be easier than you think to teach your high school students how keep their personal finances in order. To become financially fit means for students to use their money wisely and to make conscious and informed decisions with their savings and spending.

First, many accessible online resources cHow to Get Financially Fit 208x300 How to Get Financially Fitan help them create a budget that’s best for them and can help make it easier to stay on track with printables, apps, and email reminders. With the advent of banking and saving apps for smartphones, it’s now easier than ever for students with bank accounts to put away a small chunk into savings each time they get paid, which is important because you never know when an emergency will occur. Remind students to never forgo reading the fine print on any banking card options to avoid extra debit and credit card expenses like ATM fees, overdraft fees, or annual fees on top of the charges they already pay. Additionally, take advantage of the free online credit reports per bureau each year as your older student’s annual financial checkup to see if their credit is up to par so they can work on repairing it, if necessary.

The bottom line is that healthy finances can be easily achieved but not by accident. Online or offline, financial planning can work for your high school students now and in the future if you remind them to take mindful precautions and make thoughtful decisions with their money. Students will thank themselves for the time they spend planning because it is definitely worth the benefits of being financially fit for life.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 24, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE In The News: 6 Personal Finance Lessons All High School Graduates Should Know

In light of the findings of our 2014 Survey of the States, a recent US News article offers a crash course in personal finance education. The survey revealed only 17 states in the nation require high schoolers to take a personal finance course, meaning many students graduate without basic money management skills. This article provides 6 basic personal finance concepts that all high school graduates should know.

POSTED: June 19, 2014 | BY: Morgan Hoey | TAGS: ,

Teaching Opportunity – June 2014

download teaching opportunity june 2014 Teaching Opportunity   June 2014

In This Issue:

  • High School Economics, 3rd Edition – Pre-Order Now and Save $10!
  • National Economics ChallengeSM
  • Gen i Revolution Search for the Sweet 16th Contest – Winners Announced!
  • Save Lessons and Build Custom Quizzes with myEconEdLink
  • Annual Conference Registration Now Available
  • Double Your Dollars during our Challenge Grant

 
Read more…

POSTED: June 12, 2014 | BY: kwilliams | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

If you thought Keurigs have made paper coffee filters a thing of the past, think again. From filtration systems and custom hand-held fans to lampshades and taco holders, students participating in this year’s Meaningful Economics (ME*) Competition came up with creative new uses for Melitta Bentz’s 106-year old patented product.

ME Comp Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

A group of students brainstorm at this year’s ME* Competition.

The ME* Competition, produced by the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship with support from the Delaware CEE, was held recently in May, inviting Delaware elementary students to design products or services which solved an economic problem—this year’s being to help producers clear leftover inventories in a post-Keurig world.

Participating teams gave their designs catchy names, determined target markets, priced products, and planned modes of distribution. The resulting plans were then pitched to a panel of judges.

Teams were also judged in written test and production activity rounds. For the latter, students assembled a card game, matching idioms related to the use of money with their meanings. Students cut and pasted while learning about team management and job specialization, ultimately being judged by the quality and quantity of their output.

This year marked the ME* Competition’s 28th run, involving 550 students throughout Delaware. It is produced annually in partnership with Bank of America and Discover with the help of judges from Capital One and JPMorgan Chase.

POSTED: June 11, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE in the News: Lessons in Personal Finance “Compound Just Like Interest”

In a recent article, Cincinnati parents and educators discuss the need for financial education in schools. One elementary school teacher, employs free lessons from the Council for Economic Education to use with her students. According to the article, personal finance and economics educators say the messages learned from such lessons “compound just like interest and experiential learning is more likely to last.”
 

POSTED: June 10, 2014 | BY: Morgan Hoey | TAGS: ,

Resources

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