After High School

Judy Kraus from Hyde Park Middle School on Financing for College and Beyond

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 5 of 8.

Judy Kraus from Hyde Park Middle School in Las Vegas, Nevada, gets her 7th grade pre-algebra class thinking early about their future education plans and career goals. With this year-long project, she gets her students very involved by simulating their projected finances after they graduate college and are working at their chosen entry level job. The result? Students can see how much money it takes to reach their goals and be financially prepared when the time comes.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 13th.

POSTED: August 6, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Life After High School

April 11 214x300 Life After High School

By Jeffrey Lacker, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.

What path should a student choose after high school? Apply to college? Join the workforce? Enroll in career or technical training? Median earnings for college graduates are around $50,000 annually, compared to $28,000 for high school graduates, while the unemployment rate for college graduates is 3.4%, nearly half the 6.4% rate that high school graduates currently face. Given the numbers, it might be tempting to conclude that college is the best path for everyone. However, this recommendation takes into account neither the uncertainty lurking behind the reported numbers nor the preferences and constraints of the individual. Read more…

POSTED: April 11, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

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