Capital One

Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

If you thought Keurigs have made paper coffee filters a thing of the past, think again. From filtration systems and custom hand-held fans to lampshades and taco holders, students participating in this year’s Meaningful Economics (ME*) Competition came up with creative new uses for Melitta Bentz’s 106-year old patented product.

ME Comp Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

A group of students brainstorm at this year’s ME* Competition.

The ME* Competition, produced by the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship with support from the Delaware CEE, was held recently in May, inviting Delaware elementary students to design products or services which solved an economic problem—this year’s being to help producers clear leftover inventories in a post-Keurig world.

Participating teams gave their designs catchy names, determined target markets, priced products, and planned modes of distribution. The resulting plans were then pitched to a panel of judges.

Teams were also judged in written test and production activity rounds. For the latter, students assembled a card game, matching idioms related to the use of money with their meanings. Students cut and pasted while learning about team management and job specialization, ultimately being judged by the quality and quantity of their output.

This year marked the ME* Competition’s 28th run, involving 550 students throughout Delaware. It is produced annually in partnership with Bank of America and Discover with the help of judges from Capital One and JPMorgan Chase.

POSTED: June 11, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Delaware fosters discussion on Economic and Personal Finance Education

In an effort to bring attention to the continued need for personal finance education in K-12 programming, over 80 industry, government and education leaders gathered on May 5 to discuss the state of economic and personal finance education in Delaware and how they are working together to improve the economic and financial literacy of young people.

ceee1 300x200 Delaware fosters discussion on Economic and Personal Finance Education

Delaware Govenor Jack Markell.

The program, held earlier this month at the Hotel du Pont, was the first of four regional events hosted by the national Council for Economic Education (CEE) and its local affiliate, the Delaware Council on Economic Education (DCEE), and sponsored by Capital One.

Highlighted during the event was the progress already being made through the strong partnership forged with the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship (CEEE).

“An overwhelming majority of Americans, when hit with an emergency, would have less than two weeks of reserve on which to live and a huge number of people would be out on the streets,” said Gov. Jack Markell, a longtime advocate committed to financial education, in his keynote address. “So, unfortunately, most kids don’t know about money because they’re not learning about it at home.” Read more…

POSTED: May 29, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Financial Literacy within Our Communities

April 16 240x300 Financial Literacy within Our Communities By Carolyn Berkowitz, Managing VP of Community Affairs at Capital One; President of the Capital One Foundation.

Today, young people are facing challenges no other generation has faced as they become adults and adapt to an ever changing world. The great recession has left us a job market and economy that are still rebounding, while the cost of college and living are higher than ever. If our children are to grow up to be productive, independent and fulfilled, it is imperative they understand the principles of money management — how to use money wisely, how to save it and how to make it work for them.

Research shows that millennials feel strained when it comes to personal finances. In fact, earlier this year, FINRA released a survey that shows 36% of 18 to 24 year olds have student loan debt and 55% of them fear they won’t be able to pay down their loans. Only one third of respondents have emergency savings, 31% have unpaid medical bills and nearly half carry a balance on their credit cards. Read more…

POSTED: April 16, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Resources

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