Teachers and Students: Tell us ‘What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?’

CEE is excited to announce the launch of its video contest asking students in kindergarten through 12th grade for the best economic advice they can give the President of the United States. To enter the contest, record one student, or a group of students, answering the following question in 60 seconds or less:

“What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?”

Enter by Wednesday, October 7th at 11:59 p.m. Please note that teachers must enter the videos on behalf of their students. Teachers may enter more than one video per class.

Download a pdf of the rules and FAQ here. Use the hashtag #CEEVidContest to follow the contest on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Watch a video from a past CEE Video Contest Entry

 Teachers and Students: Tell us ‘What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?’


The contest is hosted on Facebook. Not all schools allow access to Facebook, so please plan accordingly by uploading your video to Facebook via a computer not associated with your school.

One winner will be chosen by CEE Facebook fans (“Viewers’ Choice”) and one winner will be chosen by economists selected as judges by CEE (“Economists’ Choice”). Prizes include a $500 American Express gift card for each teacher winner, and $25 iTunes gift cards for the student(s) featured in the winning videos.

Video Submission Period
Opens: Thursday, September 10, 2015, 9:00 a.m. ET
Closes: Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 11:59 p.m. ET

Public Voting Period
Starts: Thursday, October 8, 2015, 5:00 p.m ET
Ends: Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 p.m. ET

POSTED: September 10, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , ,

CNBC’s Steve Liesman Covers CEE’s 15th National Economics Challenge

The Council for Economic Education’s 15th National Economics Challenge finals were held in NYC on Monday. Over 10,500 students participated nationwide, with only 32 making it to the finals and only 16 to the final quiz bowl round, hosted by Steve Liesman, CNBC’s senior economics reporter. The final round was covered live on CNBC’s Power Lunch and CNBC’s Nightly Business Report on PBS featured it as well.

CNBC Power Lunch

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CNBC Nightly News Report

bbbcc91c 4179 451c af84 ec30407e032e CNBCs Steve Liesman Covers CEEs 15th National Economics Challenge

Please join us in congratulating the winning teams. To learn more about each team check out our Facebook page.

Adam Smith Division:

First Place: Mounds View High School, Arden Hills, Minnesota
Team Members: Abraham Chen, Emily Ruan, Samuel Rush and Jacob Weightman
Coach: Martha Rush


Second Place: Carmel High School, Carmel, Indiana

Third Place: Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts

Fourth Place: The Harker School, San Jose, California

David Ricardo Division:


First Place: Homestead High School, Cupertino, California
Team Members: Richard Chen, Kazu Kogachi, Steven McDonald and Erik Yang
Coach: Christy Heaton


Second Place: Carmel High School, Carmel, Indiana

Third Place: Iolani High School, Honolulu, Hawaii

Fourth Place: Charter School of Delaware, Wilmington Delaware

If you would like students in your local high school to participate, you, a teacher or a principal can contact Rosanna Castillo. They can learn more about the Challenge on our website.


POSTED: May 20, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , ,

VOTE for your favorite video from the 2015 National Economics Challenge Finalists!

nec image VOTE for your favorite video from the 2015 National Economics Challenge Finalists!

CEE asked the eight Finalist teams to prepare a video profile that shows who they are as people, students and scholars. Get over to our Facebook page and vote for your favorite team. The team with the most votes will receive a $100 Amazon gift certificate for their school and a $25 iTunes gift card for each student from the team.


The Finalist teams are:

(single semester general economics students)

  • Carmel High School /Carmel, Indiana
  • Charter School of Wilmington / Wilmington, Delaware
  • Homestead High School / Cupertino, California
  • Iolani School / Honolulu, Hawaii

(AP, IB and honors students)

  • Carmel High School /Carmel, Indiana
  • The Harker School / San Jose, California
  • Lexington High School / Lexington, Massachusetts
  • Mounds View High School / Arden Hills, Minnesota


You can VOTE once each day starting today until Friday, May 22, 5:00pm ET. We’ll announce the winning team on Monday, May 25.

This video contest has no influence on National Economics Challenge testing and judging.


POSTED: May 11, 2015 | BY: Jonathan Burch | TAGS: , , , , ,

Incorporating Economics in the Elementary School Curriculum

ohagan Incorporating Economics in the Elementary School CurriculumBy Kathleen O’Hagan, Special Representative at the UFT, Former 4th Grade Teacher, 2014 Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Teaching Champion Awardee

Today’s public schools are tasked with so much to teach that it isn’t surprising that many essential skills are over-looked with the current focus on reading and math scores and standardized tests. What is often missed in this narrow focus is the impact that these other essential skills can have on reading and math instruction. The curriculum in the elementary school where I taught was of both high rigor and high caliber but it neglected economics to concentrate on reading and math. With this in mind, I recognized the need to bring this subject to our students, the majority of whom were English Language Learners (ELLs) or former ELLs. After the economy was hit hard in 2008, I wanted my students to learn more about saving for their futures and the many long-term benefits, versus the costs, of college but I didn’t know how to bring this instruction into my elementary classroom.

OHagan in the Classroom1 300x167 Incorporating Economics in the Elementary School CurriculumThe Council for Economic Education showed me how to incorporate these ideas into my classroom. It began when I took their course on how to create a mini-economy. With this training, I was able to make our class a place where students learned (as part of their math curriculum) how to keep bank accounts, act as bankers and store clerks, open pencil-loaning businesses, and also experience the real-life issues of rent, tickets, co-payments, unexpected expenses and price inflation. Then in the next year, my next class moved beyond just being consumers in a mini-economy to being producers by utilizing a three-dimensional printer to create the store stock and in the process began to investigate the issues of supply and demand in their mini-economy. Imagine their excitement when they were featured in an article about their mini-economy, not just the first class, but two classes, two years in a row! Talk about underscoring the importance of the economics they were learning!

Not surprisingly, the students’ reaction to this instruction was enthusiastic and they were utterly engaged. What was surprising was the powerful response from the parents who were delighted to have their students learning economic vocabulary such as deposit, withdrawal, expenses, goods, consumer, etc. and the real-life experiences of keeping a financial log and having to learn about delayed gratification if they wanted to save up their money for larger purchases in the future.

In addition to all of this economic instruction, we eventually added the element of debate, around economic topics which included: “Should the Penny Stick Around?” and in so doing, incorporated elements of reading and writing. My students learned the importance of research, interviews, and public speaking in addition to developing an understanding of the need to save for the future, but not just any future, THEIR future. The mini-economy was a success at getting even the most reluctant student out of the sidelines of learning and into the heat of debate. For example, my most reluctant writer would always have his essay ready so that he could be on one side of the debate when it was time to start talking about economic issues.

The mini-economy even outgrew our classroom and spread to other classes on the grade, including inter-visitations for debates. Most importantly, it empowered the students to feel confident about making financial decisions, understanding the importance of saving, and it even made the most reticent students outspoken about the importance of economics in their life. Economics instruction ultimately became embedded in the very math and reading skills that originally seemed to have no room for anything more and in so doing, equipped my students with the traditional skills taught as well as essential economic skills.

POSTED: April 17, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , ,

Financial Literacy Month Highlights

2014 financial literacy month Financial Literacy Month HighlightsApril is Financial Literacy Month, and it’s a great opportunity to reflect on both how far we’ve come, and what challenges remain in 2015. Over the past 12 months, four states—and counting—have adopted CEE’s National Standards for Financial Literacy. This follows a period of slow to no growth as shown in CEE’s 2014 Survey of the States, which found that a majority of states do not require that students receive education in economics or personal finance education. This increased momentum may signal that the tide has at last started to turn in the right direction.

For the next four weeks CEE and our affiliates will be conducting a full roster of events to shine a spotlight on the importance of economic and financial education.  Here are some of the highlights:

VP Financial Literacy Month HighlightsVantage Point: Real World Perspectives on the Economy
An insightful and engaging discussion with an esteemed panel of experts and leaders joined us for our second annual economic symposium. Featured speakers included Professor Greg Mankiw, who gave the keynote, and Esther George, President of the Kansas City Federal Reserve, with an Update from the Fed.


Higher One, Money Matters On Campus
CEO and President Nan J. Morrison participated on a panel conducted by Higher One, sharing the results of their Money Matters On Campus survey.

State Council Events
Meanwhile, our state council affiliates have been working diligently to promote financial literacy carrying out a host of activities: the Ohio Council for Economic Education welcomed Jeff Immelt, (CEO, General Electric) as keynote speaker at their 2015 Awards Luncheon; and in Rhode Island, students and guests including U.S. Congressman Jim Langevin and State Treasurer Seth Magaziner, kicked off the month with a “‘Financial Frenzy’ Forum.”

bedtime math e1428507502789 Financial Literacy Month HighlightsMoney Math Mondays
New this year we’ll be featuring Money Math Mondays throughout the month, a series of financial literacy-related math problems for parents and kids created by the founder of Bedtime Math.


CEE Blog Features Leaders Promoting Financial Literacy
We are excited to share perspectives from some of the leading voices in economics and personal finance. Guest bloggers include Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), Congressman Steve Stivers (R-OH), Richard Cordray (Director, CFPB), David Wessel (Director, Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, Brookings), Raymond W. McDaniel, Jr. (President and CEO, Moody’s) and Kelli Grant (Consumer Reporter, CNBC.com). Be sure to tune in; we’ll be posting new articles every week!



POSTED: April 10, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , ,

CEE Launches Math in the Real World

Math in the Real World CEE Launches Math in the Real WorldThe Council for Economic Education has launched its newest resource: Math in the Real World. Math in the Real World contains interdisciplinary lessons aimed at teaching personal finance and economic concepts, all in the context of math lessons.

Math in the Real World includes lessons that range from “Break-Even Analysis” and “Profit Maximization” to lessons on payday loan expenses and building good credit.

Read more…

POSTED: December 8, 2014 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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