Lessons

K-12 Teachers! Enter our video contest for a chance to win $1,000.

Roll the camera…!

Calling all K-12 classroom teachers to enter our video contest for a chance to win $1,000 and one complimentary registration to our annual conference. We’ve been teasing you for weeks with details, and now we’ve officially opened the entry system.

CEE wants to know:

What is your most creative idea for implementing personal finance into the classroom?

We’re looking for creative ideas from K-12 teachers on how you incorporate these concepts in the classroom. You should record yourself explaining or demonstrating (in 30 seconds or less) a specific lesson, activity or project. Think of this as an ‘elevator pitch’ for your best lesson, original idea or creative spin on an existing concept.

Submit your video(s) beginning today through Sunday, April 14 at 11:59pm EST.

Public voting for entries begins Tuesday, April 16 at 9:00am EST and ends Monday, April 29 at 11:59pm EST. Anyone can vote, so we encourage you to share your video when we send you the link!

Two ‘Grand Prizes’ will be awarded on April 30, and all videos will be featured on CEE’s websites and Facebook pages.

Grand Prizes for Viewer’s Choice and CEE’s Choice:
Two winners will receive a $1,000 American Express gift card for classroom use and one complimentary registration ($125 value) to CEE’s 52nd Annual Financial Literacy and Economic Education Conference in Baltimore, MD in October.

Good luck!

POSTED: April 1, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , ,

Video Contest for Teachers: What is your most creative idea for implementing personal finance into the classroom?

Calling all K-12 classroom teachers! Enter our video contest for a chance to win $1,000 and one complimentary registration to our annual conference. CEE will conduct an online video contest during the 2013 Financial Literacy Month (April 1- 30).

Teachers: What is your most creative idea for implementing personal finance into the classroom?

During Financial Literacy Month (FLM), when CEE raises awareness for the importance of financial literacy education, we’re looking for creative ideas from K-12 teachers on how you incorporate these concepts in the classroom. You should record yourself explaining or demonstrating (in 30 seconds or less) a specific lesson, activity or project. Think of this as an ‘elevator pitch’ for your best lesson, original idea or creative spin on an existing concept.

Need inspiration? Watch CEE’s Doug Young as he uses the board game ‘Look Out Wall Street!‘ to teach the bulls and bears of personal finance.

dougs tip video Video Contest for Teachers: What is your most creative idea for implementing personal finance into the classroom?

Submit your video(s) beginning April 1 at 9:00am EST through Sunday, April 14 at 11:59pm EST.

Public voting for entries begins Tuesday, April 16 at 9:00am EST and ends Monday, April 29 at 11:59pm EST.

Two ‘Grand Prizes’ will be awarded on April 30, and all videos will be featured on CEE’s websites and Facebook pages.

Grand Prize: Viewers’ Choice:
The winner of the Viewers’ Choice award will receive a $1,000 American Express gift card for classroom use and one complimentary registration ($125 value) to CEE’s 52nd Annual Financial Literacy and Economic Education Conference in Baltimore, MD in October.

Grand Prize: CEE’s Choice:
The winner of the CEE’s Choice award will receive a $1,000 American Express gift card for classroom use and one complimentary registration ($125 value) to CEE’s 52nd Annual Financial Literacy and Economic Education Conference in Baltimore, MD in October.

Start prepping your videos today, and you’ll be ready to enter when the contest opens April 1. Read the complete rules and guidelines on our Facebook page.

Good luck. We look forward to watching your tips and tricks for teaching financial literacy!

POSTED: March 26, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , ,

CEE’s Classroom Mini-Economy Teachers 4th Graders How to Pay the Bills and Have Fun

Kate O’Hagan, a 4th grade teacher in Brooklyn, NY, uses CEE’s ‘Classroom Mini-Economy’ to teach real-world lessons in her class.

The United Federation of Teachers wrote a great article about Kate and her class, “Although they’re having fun, these children at PS 97 in Brooklyn are learning the serious business of being a grown-up in the Classroom Mini-Economy project, which O’Hagan began this past September after taking a free professional development unit on it at the Council for Economic Education in Manhattan.” Read more…

POSTED: February 6, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Teaching Opportunity – February 2013

In this issue:

  • Advanced Placement Webinars
  • Teaching the News
  • This Day in History
  • Teach the Theme: Debt Ceiling
  • Featured Lesson Plans
  • FRED in the Classroom: Debt and Deficit
  • Mineral-Rich Mongolia
  • What is the “Dutch Disease”?

Read more…

POSTED: February 1, 2013 | BY: kwilliams | TAGS:

CEE in the News: Reality Check

Tennessee is one of only 14 states that require high school students to take a course in personal finance, according to CEE’s Survey of the States biennial report.

“Reality Check,” a program sponsored by the Chattanooga, TN Chamber of Commerce, teaches ninth-grade students how to budget their money. The Chattanooga Times Free Press documented the one-day exercise in an effort to bring attention to the need for financial literacy in high school. Read more…

POSTED: January 23, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

Why Students Need Financial Literacy by Brian Page

Diane Ravitch, former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education, is a historian of education, an educational policy analyst and a research professor at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. She also writes an education blog that is widely read, and sometime closely scrutinized, but the industry.

Today, her blog featured a guest post by Brian Page, award-winning educator, who demonstrates the same passion and drive for education as Ravitch does.

From Page’s post, “I want our children first introduced to complicated financial concepts and contracts by teachers who love them and who are trying to help them, not by someone trying to trick them. Relying on the school of hard knocks should not be an option anymore. It is time a step is added in the ladder to empower future generations to make wise and informed financial choices. Personal Finance should be integrated into every child’s K-12 educational experience, and a course in Personal Finance should be a semester-long high school graduation requirement.”

We couldn’t agree more. Read the full post here, and see what Ravitch has to say on her blog here.

POSTED: January 16, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , ,

Resources

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