Parents

The Case for K-12 Financial Education from Take Charge America’s Michael Staten

michael staten The Case for K 12 Financial Education from Take Charge Americas Michael StatenBy Michael Staten, Take Charge America Endowed Chair; Director, Take Charge America Institute, University of Arizona.

Kudos to CEE for devoting their blog space this month to many different voices making the case for financial education. I share the dilemma of every end-of-program speaker struggling to find something new to say. So, in these waning days of Financial Literacy Month, let me offer a few additional thoughts in support of school-based financial education for grades K-12.

Research has shown that the largest single determinant of money attitudes in teenagers and young adults is their parents, and the home environment in which they grow up.  But, that influence can be positive or negative. If we treat financial education as solely the responsibility of parents, then we admit that young people will not start their adult lives on a level playing field. Read more…

POSTED: April 25, 2013 | BY: Leslie Rasimas | TAGS: , , , , ,

GISS It: Financial Life Skills Can Help Our Children and Our Society

Nancy Phillips 240x300 GISS It: Financial Life Skills Can Help Our Children and Our SocietyBy Nancy Phillips, BS, EMBA, Author and Speaker; Founder & President, DollarSmartKids Enterprises, Inc.; Creator of the Zela Wela Kids. Nancy is the mother of two elementary school-aged children.

As parents, we are automatic educators, and we want our children to learn the skills they’ll need to thrive and reach their full potential in life. This is true for parents around the world. With the financial industry and global culture changing as rapidly as they are today, it’s easy to see that our children need guidance; current, effective, honest information, that has their best interest and future well-being at heart.

The Lessons Must Have These Key Elements

These core financial life lessons must involve a combination of information, beginning with inspirational and motivational messages, so children understand how the information can affect their individual lives. The messages must also be simple, and effective – so the lessons are implemented and become habit. Beneficial learning only occurs if the new information is implemented, thus creating positive decision-making skills and behavior. Read more…

POSTED: April 23, 2013 | BY: Leslie Rasimas | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

Seven Things Every College Student Should Know About Personal Finance

Christian Ackmann 218x300 Seven Things Every College Student Should Know About Personal FinanceBy Christian Ackmann, Economics concentrator at Brown University; Winner of the 2012 National Personal Finance Challenge.

You would be surprised to know the number of college students who don’t know how build their credit history, view their account balances, or even write a check.  College is usually the first time that students acquire independence, yet some students remain dependent on their parents’ financial support and advice.  Proper financial education in high school is necessary to gain financial independence in college.  During my first year of college, I have seen many financial mistakes made by my fellow students.  Here are some of the things I believe every college student should know about personal finance to make intelligent financial decisions.

1.  Credit
When I asked my fellow classmates which financial topics they wished they knew more about, the unanimous answer was credit.  For many college students, credit cards are a thing of mystery.  They are magical pieces of plastic that somehow pay for pizza and gasoline using money from their parents.  The first step to establishing a solid credit history is understanding how credit works.  Once students understand the importance of credit, it can be very helpful to have a credit card in the student’s name (not the parent’s name) to encourage responsibility.  Paying the credit card bill in full each month is an easy way to build a good credit history, not to mention the perks that many cards offer, such as cash back or air miles (which are especially applicable to college students living away from home). Read more…

POSTED: April 20, 2013 | BY: Leslie Rasimas | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

We can do better than this. Our children need financial literacy.

Lynn Fitch We can do better than this. Our children need financial literacy.By State Treasurer of Mississippi Lynn Fitch.

On my way to make a speech recently, I made a quick stop at a local convenience store to grab a diet coke.  “That will be $2.28,” the young girl smiled.  As I handed her three $1 bills, the cash register chirped and the drawer popped open.  She reached for my change. “Oh wait,” I said, “I have three pennies.”  Her pleasant smile quickly faded and was replaced with a blank stare into the cash drawer. “Um…..hmmm…..uh…..so…..I’m not sure what to do,” she said in a confused, sheepish tone.

It’s unfortunate that many of our young people can’t count change or do the math.  We must give them the financial skill set and tools to succeed in life so they don’t have to learn the hard way.  We must create financial freedom for our children. Read more…

POSTED: April 4, 2013 | BY: Leslie Rasimas | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

CEE in the News: Why We Need to Teach Financial Literacy in Schools

Suzanne McGee of The Fiscal Times is a proponent of financial literacy education, both at home and in our schools. After a media luncheon with Nan J. Morrison, CEE president & CEO, McGee followed up with her blog post on what she learned from teaching “Wall Street 101,” and how we can do better for our nation’s youth.

“It isn’t about giving kids rules, Morrison points out: Just telling them to save 10 percent of their income is about as useful as telling an overweight child to eat less and exercise more. What helps more is teaching that child to make healthy choices and discover the rewards of physical activity. Similarly, helping a child to become fiscally fit means giving them tools to make sensible decisions on a day-to-day basis, not just putting aside an arbitrary percentage of their income.”

You can read McGee’s full post on The Fiscal Times here.

POSTED: March 12, 2013 | BY: Leslie Rasimas | TAGS: , , , , , ,

CEE in the News: Why Teens Fail at Managing Money

CEE’s Survey of the States is often referenced in articles such as this one from MSN Money, ‘Why Teens Fail at Managing Money.’ Findings from the Survey show that over the last two years, economics and personal finance requirements to graduate high school are slowing and in some cases moving backwards.

Today’s student loan debt is more than the national credit card debt, and if students continue to graduate high school and college without financial literacy, both numbers could continue to climb exponentially.

Read the complete story here, and leave your comments below.

POSTED: January 7, 2013 | BY: Leslie Rasimas | TAGS: , , , , , , , ,

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