Personal Finance Education

65 Years of Delivering Economic Education and Financial Literacy

Since its inception in 1948 the Council for Economic Education has made it its mission to deliver economic education and financial literacy to K-12 students nationwide. In this overview, you’ll see how for the past 65 years the Council has used ever-changing techniques to educate the educators. By equipping teachers with innovative resources, the Council has made great strides in improving the education of economics and personal finance in our schools.

Watch CEE’s New 2014 Overview Video

POSTED: November 10, 2014 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Teach Your Child Sound Economic Principles

Selena Swartzfager hs rgb1 Teach Your Child Sound Economic PrinciplesSelena Swartzfager, leader of the Mississippi Council for Economic Education, writes an insightful article about second chances and the importance of raising your children to know sound economic principles. Swartzfager believes that no one is ever too young to become financially literate. It doesn’t matter if you’re only twelve, you can still learn about opportunity costs, the importance of savings and W-9s.

POSTED: October 21, 2014 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School on Having a Digital Classroom

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 8 of 8.

Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School in Oakland, Maryland, has spent her career teaching economics fusing it with her other passion, immersive technology for the classroom. For her, economics lessons come alive when they are paired with the ground breaking information found on web portals and discovered with easy to use platforms such as tablets. With these tools, Ms. Bender is able to teach complementary lessons on economics and digital citizenship by showing students what tools to use and how to use them responsibly.

This completes CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education. Keep checking back for more weekly updates on our blog!

POSTED: August 27, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary on Combining Music and Economics

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 7 of 8.

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary in Frederick, Maryland, incorporated singing into her classroom help her students to grasp economics concepts. By serving as an example of combining music and economics, Ms. Neely inspired students (singers and non-singers alike) to create their own individual pieces of music, using concepts they learned and implementing them their own way, proving that they understood what was taught.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 27th, 2014.

POSTED: August 20, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Judy Kraus from Hyde Park Middle School on Financing for College and Beyond

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 5 of 8.

Judy Kraus from Hyde Park Middle School in Las Vegas, Nevada, gets her 7th grade pre-algebra class thinking early about their future education plans and career goals. With this year-long project, she gets her students very involved by simulating their projected finances after they graduate college and are working at their chosen entry level job. The result? Students can see how much money it takes to reach their goals and be financially prepared when the time comes.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 13th.

POSTED: August 6, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

For Florida’s Students, Money Matters

It’s a sobering thought: Florida’s students are graduating high school without a good understanding of how to manage money.

mikebellheadshotfcee 300x225 For Floridas Students, Money Matters

Michael L. Bell, M.E.d., Executive Director of the Florida Council on Economic Education

The unfortunate truth is, nearly half of Florida’s graduating seniors lack comprehension of financial basics like credit scores, balancing checkbooks, paying back loans and avoiding bankruptcy. For each student who graduates prepared, another leaves school unready to meet financial challenges.

One of the reasons for this is lack of adequate financial education. A recent study by the Council for Economic Education found that students in states with a specific, required financial literacy course were more likely to save and pay off credit cards, and less likely to be compulsive buyers and make late payments.

Florida took a step in the right direction in 2013 by including financial literacy content in its education standards – but it didn’t go far enough.

While deliberating the bill that introduced some level of financial education to our students, lawmakers became alarmed by the growing trend of crushing personal debt incurred by high-school graduates. Research has shown this debt not only impairs their ability to find a job, but also their ability to keep one.

Fortunately, lawmakers did the right thing in that 2013 bill that required financial literacy for our high-school students. The Florida Department of Education also studied the cost of a one-semester, half-credit statewide course and found it to be very reasonable, as little as $140,000. And last month, the DOE finished updating our state’s education standards to prepare for a required financial literacy course.

So what’s left to do?

Lawmakers just need now to finish what they’ve started, by passing legislation to create that required course on financial literacy. We call it the Money Course. But Florida’s students – and businesses – may well call it a lifesaver when our graduating seniors hit campuses, offices and shops knowing how to keep and manage their money for a lifetime.

This article was originally written by Michael Bell and posted on the Pensacola News Journal July 26th 2014.

POSTED: July 31, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Resources

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