Students

CEE’s Free Car Shopper App Available

The Council for Economic Education is introducing their new Car Shopper App, now available on the Android App store for free! Teach students what it really means to purchase a car with Car Shopper. With this app, it’s easy for students to unlock the hidden costs of their dream car in order to see for themselves. Students will be able to compare what they thought the cost of a car was versus the actual cost, by seeing the app adding up gas prices and factoring in finance options.

Inside the app, students can pick the type of car they want while the app links to real and current prices of cars. After selecting their car, students then get to choose financing options for their purchase by toggling the amount of money they want to put down, the finance rate, and contract length. Next, gas prices are then factored in and tailored to your region for accuracy in pricing. By the end, the student is shown a breakdown of the car’s price, indicating the final total and the price per month.

Carshopper App1 182x300 CEE’s Free Car Shopper App Available

This visual representation will show students, first-hand, the cost-benefit analysis of buying their dream car. By taking them step-by-step through the process, this free app is able to show how the prices add up and how buying a car is something to be carefully calculated before making any purchase.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: July 22, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Dr. Sonia Noyola from Collegiate High School on Using Film to Teach Economics

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 2 of 8

Dr. Sonia Noyola from Collegiate High School in Corpus Christi, Texas, explains how she motivates her high school seniors by assigning a class project where students are tasked with creating their own short films to explain and demonstrate economic concepts like scarcity and opportunity cost.


Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on July 23th, 2014.

POSTED: July 16, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Get Financially Fit

With many money management resources at your fingertips, it can be easier than you think to teach your high school students how keep their personal finances in order. To become financially fit means for students to use their money wisely and to make conscious and informed decisions with their savings and spending.

First, many accessible online resources cHow to Get Financially Fit 208x300 How to Get Financially Fitan help them create a budget that’s best for them and can help make it easier to stay on track with printables, apps, and email reminders. With the advent of banking and saving apps for smartphones, it’s now easier than ever for students with bank accounts to put away a small chunk into savings each time they get paid, which is important because you never know when an emergency will occur. Remind students to never forgo reading the fine print on any banking card options to avoid extra debit and credit card expenses like ATM fees, overdraft fees, or annual fees on top of the charges they already pay. Additionally, take advantage of the free online credit reports per bureau each year as your older student’s annual financial checkup to see if their credit is up to par so they can work on repairing it, if necessary.

The bottom line is that healthy finances can be easily achieved but not by accident. Online or offline, financial planning can work for your high school students now and in the future if you remind them to take mindful precautions and make thoughtful decisions with their money. Students will thank themselves for the time they spend planning because it is definitely worth the benefits of being financially fit for life.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 24, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

If you thought Keurigs have made paper coffee filters a thing of the past, think again. From filtration systems and custom hand-held fans to lampshades and taco holders, students participating in this year’s Meaningful Economics (ME*) Competition came up with creative new uses for Melitta Bentz’s 106-year old patented product.

ME Comp Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

A group of students brainstorm at this year’s ME* Competition.

The ME* Competition, produced by the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship with support from the Delaware CEE, was held recently in May, inviting Delaware elementary students to design products or services which solved an economic problem—this year’s being to help producers clear leftover inventories in a post-Keurig world.

Participating teams gave their designs catchy names, determined target markets, priced products, and planned modes of distribution. The resulting plans were then pitched to a panel of judges.

Teams were also judged in written test and production activity rounds. For the latter, students assembled a card game, matching idioms related to the use of money with their meanings. Students cut and pasted while learning about team management and job specialization, ultimately being judged by the quality and quantity of their output.

This year marked the ME* Competition’s 28th run, involving 550 students throughout Delaware. It is produced annually in partnership with Bank of America and Discover with the help of judges from Capital One and JPMorgan Chase.

POSTED: June 11, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Delaware fosters discussion on Economic and Personal Finance Education

In an effort to bring attention to the continued need for personal finance education in K-12 programming, over 80 industry, government and education leaders gathered on May 5 to discuss the state of economic and personal finance education in Delaware and how they are working together to improve the economic and financial literacy of young people.

ceee1 300x200 Delaware fosters discussion on Economic and Personal Finance Education

Delaware Govenor Jack Markell.

The program, held earlier this month at the Hotel du Pont, was the first of four regional events hosted by the national Council for Economic Education (CEE) and its local affiliate, the Delaware Council on Economic Education (DCEE), and sponsored by Capital One.

Highlighted during the event was the progress already being made through the strong partnership forged with the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship (CEEE).

“An overwhelming majority of Americans, when hit with an emergency, would have less than two weeks of reserve on which to live and a huge number of people would be out on the streets,” said Gov. Jack Markell, a longtime advocate committed to financial education, in his keynote address. “So, unfortunately, most kids don’t know about money because they’re not learning about it at home.” Read more…

POSTED: May 29, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE launches Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus

Last week on May 21, the Council for Economic Education hosted Senator Jack Reed (RI) and Senator Mike Enzi (WY) in Washington, DC for a very exciting announcement: the official launch of the Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus, a bipartisan effort to ensure that all Americans are equipped with the essential skills and education they need.

senateFEL1 300x198 CEE launches Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus

Senator Jack Reed (RI) talking with CEE CEO & President Nan Morrison (right) and RI CEE President Margaret Brooks (left).

Senator Reed stressed the importance of bringing people from all sides together to address the issue of financial literacy, “a critical problem for future generations.” Financial education is a lifelong endeavor, he continued, and “has to start in elementary and secondary schools, and lead into the college arena.”  The Caucus, he hopes, will be a “catalyst for positive change.”

Senator Enzi addressed the need for access to information and tools to help Americans make the right choices, like saving for retirement, buying insurance, or investing.

Following their remarks, the room turned its attention to an important and timely question: what role should the federal government play in supporting financial literacy? Read more…

POSTED: May 28, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , ,

Resources

See our featured classroom materials. Free Download