Teachers

Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School on Having a Digital Classroom

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 8 of 8.

Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School in Oakland, Maryland, has spent her career teaching economics fusing it with her other passion, immersive technology for the classroom. For her, economics lessons come alive when they are paired with the ground breaking information found on web portals and discovered with easy to use platforms such as tablets. With these tools, Ms. Bender is able to teach complementary lessons on economics and digital citizenship by showing students what tools to use and how to use them responsibly.

This completes CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education. Keep checking back for more weekly updates on our blog!

POSTED: August 27, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary on Combining Music and Economics

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 7 of 8.

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary in Frederick, Maryland, incorporated singing into her classroom help her students to grasp economics concepts. By serving as an example of combining music and economics, Ms. Neely inspired students (singers and non-singers alike) to create their own individual pieces of music, using concepts they learned and implementing them their own way, proving that they understood what was taught.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 27th, 2014.

POSTED: August 20, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Lynda Motiram from Old Mill High School on Using Graph Relay Races

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 6 of 8.

Lynda Motiram from Old Mill High School in Millersville, Maryland, adopted graph relays as a classroom activity that quickly became a favorite tool for reinforcing economic concepts. Ms. Motiram recommends this easy-preparation activity to keep your class engaged by working and collaborating in group and using board work to reinforce the lessons. For Ms. Motiram, one of the best outcomes is seeing students that are struggling with the lecture grasp the concepts when using the graph relay.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 20th.

POSTED: August 13, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

For Florida’s Students, Money Matters

It’s a sobering thought: Florida’s students are graduating high school without a good understanding of how to manage money.

mikebellheadshotfcee 300x225 For Floridas Students, Money Matters

Michael L. Bell, M.E.d., Executive Director of the Florida Council on Economic Education

The unfortunate truth is, nearly half of Florida’s graduating seniors lack comprehension of financial basics like credit scores, balancing checkbooks, paying back loans and avoiding bankruptcy. For each student who graduates prepared, another leaves school unready to meet financial challenges.

One of the reasons for this is lack of adequate financial education. A recent study by the Council for Economic Education found that students in states with a specific, required financial literacy course were more likely to save and pay off credit cards, and less likely to be compulsive buyers and make late payments.

Florida took a step in the right direction in 2013 by including financial literacy content in its education standards – but it didn’t go far enough.

While deliberating the bill that introduced some level of financial education to our students, lawmakers became alarmed by the growing trend of crushing personal debt incurred by high-school graduates. Research has shown this debt not only impairs their ability to find a job, but also their ability to keep one.

Fortunately, lawmakers did the right thing in that 2013 bill that required financial literacy for our high-school students. The Florida Department of Education also studied the cost of a one-semester, half-credit statewide course and found it to be very reasonable, as little as $140,000. And last month, the DOE finished updating our state’s education standards to prepare for a required financial literacy course.

So what’s left to do?

Lawmakers just need now to finish what they’ve started, by passing legislation to create that required course on financial literacy. We call it the Money Course. But Florida’s students – and businesses – may well call it a lifesaver when our graduating seniors hit campuses, offices and shops knowing how to keep and manage their money for a lifetime.

This article was originally written by Michael Bell and posted on the Pensacola News Journal July 26th 2014.

POSTED: July 31, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Florence Falatko from Cromwell Valley Elementary on Teaching Outside of the Classroom

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 4 of 8.

Florence Falatko from Cromwell Valley Elementary Regional Magnet School of Technology in Towson, Maryland, teaches 5th graders that are motivated and excited to learn about economics in and out of the classroom. Ms. Falatko has found innovation with Edmodo, a web platform administered by the teacher, where students can discuss and collaborate on projects in addition to communicating with their teacher during off hours. The result? Students leave Ms. Falatko’s economics class with a thorough understanding of financial literacy as they go forward for the rest of their education.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 6th

POSTED: July 30, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jennifer O’Neil from Concord High School on Economics and Entrepreneurship

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 3 of 8.

Jennifer O’Neil from Concord High School in Wilmington, Delaware, has shown her students that creativity goes hand-in-hand with economics. After finishing the entrepreneurial section of CEE’s publication, Financial Fitness for Life, she divided her class into groups of two or three students and assigned a project — to create never-before-seen product and put it out to market. Her students came up with phenomenal ideas for products and apps and Ms. O’Neil was able to demonstrate the importance of entrepreneurs in helping our economy.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on July 30th 2014.

POSTED: July 23, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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