Teachers

Lynda Motiram from Old Mill High School on Using Graph Relay Races

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 6 of 8.

Lynda Motiram from Old Mill High School in Millersville, Maryland, adopted graph relays as a classroom activity that quickly became a favorite tool for reinforcing economic concepts. Ms. Motiram recommends this easy-preparation activity to keep your class engaged by working and collaborating in group and using board work to reinforce the lessons. For Ms. Motiram, one of the best outcomes is seeing students that are struggling with the lecture grasp the concepts when using the graph relay.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 20th.

POSTED: August 13, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

For Florida’s Students, Money Matters

It’s a sobering thought: Florida’s students are graduating high school without a good understanding of how to manage money.

mikebellheadshotfcee 300x225 For Floridas Students, Money Matters

Michael L. Bell, M.E.d., Executive Director of the Florida Council on Economic Education

The unfortunate truth is, nearly half of Florida’s graduating seniors lack comprehension of financial basics like credit scores, balancing checkbooks, paying back loans and avoiding bankruptcy. For each student who graduates prepared, another leaves school unready to meet financial challenges.

One of the reasons for this is lack of adequate financial education. A recent study by the Council for Economic Education found that students in states with a specific, required financial literacy course were more likely to save and pay off credit cards, and less likely to be compulsive buyers and make late payments.

Florida took a step in the right direction in 2013 by including financial literacy content in its education standards – but it didn’t go far enough.

While deliberating the bill that introduced some level of financial education to our students, lawmakers became alarmed by the growing trend of crushing personal debt incurred by high-school graduates. Research has shown this debt not only impairs their ability to find a job, but also their ability to keep one.

Fortunately, lawmakers did the right thing in that 2013 bill that required financial literacy for our high-school students. The Florida Department of Education also studied the cost of a one-semester, half-credit statewide course and found it to be very reasonable, as little as $140,000. And last month, the DOE finished updating our state’s education standards to prepare for a required financial literacy course.

So what’s left to do?

Lawmakers just need now to finish what they’ve started, by passing legislation to create that required course on financial literacy. We call it the Money Course. But Florida’s students – and businesses – may well call it a lifesaver when our graduating seniors hit campuses, offices and shops knowing how to keep and manage their money for a lifetime.

This article was originally written by Michael Bell and posted on the Pensacola News Journal July 26th 2014.

POSTED: July 31, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Florence Falatko from Cromwell Valley Elementary on Teaching Outside of the Classroom

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 4 of 8.

Florence Falatko from Cromwell Valley Elementary Regional Magnet School of Technology in Towson, Maryland, teaches 5th graders that are motivated and excited to learn about economics in and out of the classroom. Ms. Falatko has found innovation with Edmodo, a web platform administered by the teacher, where students can discuss and collaborate on projects in addition to communicating with their teacher during off hours. The result? Students leave Ms. Falatko’s economics class with a thorough understanding of financial literacy as they go forward for the rest of their education.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 6th

POSTED: July 30, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jennifer O’Neil from Concord High School on Economics and Entrepreneurship

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 3 of 8.

Jennifer O’Neil from Concord High School in Wilmington, Delaware, has shown her students that creativity goes hand-in-hand with economics. After finishing the entrepreneurial section of CEE’s publication, Financial Fitness for Life, she divided her class into groups of two or three students and assigned a project — to create never-before-seen product and put it out to market. Her students came up with phenomenal ideas for products and apps and Ms. O’Neil was able to demonstrate the importance of entrepreneurs in helping our economy.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on July 30th 2014.

POSTED: July 23, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE’s Free Car Shopper App Available

The Council for Economic Education is introducing their new Car Shopper App, now available on the Android App store for free! Teach students what it really means to purchase a car with Car Shopper. With this app, it’s easy for students to unlock the hidden costs of their dream car in order to see for themselves. Students will be able to compare what they thought the cost of a car was versus the actual cost, by seeing the app adding up gas prices and factoring in finance options.

Inside the app, students can pick the type of car they want while the app links to real and current prices of cars. After selecting their car, students then get to choose financing options for their purchase by toggling the amount of money they want to put down, the finance rate, and contract length. Next, gas prices are then factored in and tailored to your region for accuracy in pricing. By the end, the student is shown a breakdown of the car’s price, indicating the final total and the price per month.

Carshopper App1 182x300 CEE’s Free Car Shopper App Available

This visual representation will show students, first-hand, the cost-benefit analysis of buying their dream car. By taking them step-by-step through the process, this free app is able to show how the prices add up and how buying a car is something to be carefully calculated before making any purchase.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: July 22, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Get Financially Fit

With many money management resources at your fingertips, it can be easier than you think to teach your high school students how keep their personal finances in order. To become financially fit means for students to use their money wisely and to make conscious and informed decisions with their savings and spending.

First, many accessible online resources cHow to Get Financially Fit 208x300 How to Get Financially Fitan help them create a budget that’s best for them and can help make it easier to stay on track with printables, apps, and email reminders. With the advent of banking and saving apps for smartphones, it’s now easier than ever for students with bank accounts to put away a small chunk into savings each time they get paid, which is important because you never know when an emergency will occur. Remind students to never forgo reading the fine print on any banking card options to avoid extra debit and credit card expenses like ATM fees, overdraft fees, or annual fees on top of the charges they already pay. Additionally, take advantage of the free online credit reports per bureau each year as your older student’s annual financial checkup to see if their credit is up to par so they can work on repairing it, if necessary.

The bottom line is that healthy finances can be easily achieved but not by accident. Online or offline, financial planning can work for your high school students now and in the future if you remind them to take mindful precautions and make thoughtful decisions with their money. Students will thank themselves for the time they spend planning because it is definitely worth the benefits of being financially fit for life.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 24, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Resources

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