Teaching

Dr. Sonia Noyola from Collegiate High School on Using Film to Teach Economics

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 2 of 8

Dr. Sonia Noyola from Collegiate High School in Corpus Christi, Texas, explains how she motivates her high school seniors by assigning a class project where students are tasked with creating their own short films to explain and demonstrate economic concepts like scarcity and opportunity cost.


Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on July 23th, 2014.

POSTED: July 16, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jean McKnight from Cienega High School, Arizona on Tech for Teachers

CEE’s new Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 1 of 8.

Jean McKnight from Cienega High School in Tuscon, Arizona, has discovered that her freshman class, armed with laptops in hand, is more likely to be engaged in learning if they can combine learning with being on the computer. Apps, websites, and videos bring economic concepts to light for her high school students and spark a love of learning that wasn’t there before.


Also of interest… check out “Tech for Teachers” presentation by CEE’s Director of Educational Technology, John LeFeber found on EconEdLink, here.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on July 16th, 2014.

POSTED: July 9, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education

What better source is there to learn from than straight from teachers in the trenches?

CEE’s new Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons.

This summer, we will share some tips and ideas from the following teachers:

  • Jean McKnight from Cienega High School, Arizona on Tech for Teachers
  • Dr. Sonia Noyola from Collegiate High School, Texas on Using Film to Teach Economics
  • Jennifer O’Neil from Concord High School, Delaware on Economics and Entrepreneurship
  • Florence Falatko from Cromwell Valley Elementary Regional Magnet School of Technology, Maryland on Teaching Outside of the Classroom
  • Judy Kraus from Hyde Park Middle School, Nevada on Financing for College and Beyond
  • Lynda Motiram from Old Mill High School, Maryland on Using Graph Relay Races
  • Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary, Maryland on Combining Music and Economics
  • Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School, Maryland on Having a Digital Classroom

Stay tuned…CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education, begins July 9, 2014.

POSTED: July 8, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Calling All Teachers: Join the Council for Economic Education For 53rd Annual Financial and Economic Literacy Conference in Dallas

Hands-On Sessions and Valuable Networking Opportunities for K-12 Educators

DALLAS, TX (June 25, 2014) This October, the Council for Economic Education will convene over 500 K-12 educators, industry thought leaders, and local affiliate, Federal Reserve and other partners from across the country for the 53rd Annual Financial and Economic Literacy Conference in Dallas, Texas. With networking events and over 100 hands-on training sessions, teachers can attest to the conference’s invaluable benefits: 96% of 2013 attendees reported that they are still using information or resources they gained at the conference; and 100% of attendees would recommend CEE’s Annual Conference to a colleague. And what’s more, by attending, teachers will earn certificates of completion that may be applied toward CEU requirements.

Annual Conference sessions are designed to help teachers incorporate economic and financial literacy in the classroom, offering an incredible opportunity to share and exchange ideas. A few highlights:

Additionally, special roundtable sessions led by master teachers offer an opportunity to share best practices at the elementary, middle and high school levels.

This year’s distinguished guest speakers include  Richard2014 conference tall sponsor 180x300 Calling All Teachers: Join the Council for Economic Education For  53rd Annual Financial and Economic Literacy Conference in Dallas  W. Fisher (invited), President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas; Sharon Epperson, CNBC Senior Energy and Personal Finance Correspondent and frequent contributor to Today and NBC Nightly News; and Professor Alan B. Krueger, Bendheim Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University. Professor Krueger served as Chairman of President Barack Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers and a Member of his Cabinet from November 2011 to August 2013.

The 53rd Annual Financial and Economic Literacy Conference will be held October 8 – 11 at the Renaissance Dallas Hotel in Dallas, Texas.

For more information about the Annual Conference and to register please visit: http://www.councilforeconed.org/events/cee-national-conference/

About the Council for Economic Education

The Council for Economic Education is the leading organization in the United States that focuses on the economic and financial education of students from kindergarten through high school – and we have been doing so for 65 years. We carry out our mission by educating the educators: providing the curriculum tools, the pedagogical support, and the community of peers that instruct, inspire, and guide. All resources and programs are developed by educators, and delivered by our national network of affiliates. Our goal is to reach and teach every child. Each year CEE’s programs reach more than 55,000 K-12 teachers and over 5 million students across the United States. For further information about the Council for Economic Education go to: http://www.councilforeconed.org.

POSTED: June 30, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Get Financially Fit

With many money management resources at your fingertips, it can be easier than you think to teach your high school students how keep their personal finances in order. To become financially fit means for students to use their money wisely and to make conscious and informed decisions with their savings and spending.

First, many accessible online resources cHow to Get Financially Fit 208x300 How to Get Financially Fitan help them create a budget that’s best for them and can help make it easier to stay on track with printables, apps, and email reminders. With the advent of banking and saving apps for smartphones, it’s now easier than ever for students with bank accounts to put away a small chunk into savings each time they get paid, which is important because you never know when an emergency will occur. Remind students to never forgo reading the fine print on any banking card options to avoid extra debit and credit card expenses like ATM fees, overdraft fees, or annual fees on top of the charges they already pay. Additionally, take advantage of the free online credit reports per bureau each year as your older student’s annual financial checkup to see if their credit is up to par so they can work on repairing it, if necessary.

The bottom line is that healthy finances can be easily achieved but not by accident. Online or offline, financial planning can work for your high school students now and in the future if you remind them to take mindful precautions and make thoughtful decisions with their money. Students will thank themselves for the time they spend planning because it is definitely worth the benefits of being financially fit for life.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 24, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Is Your School Churning Out Best-Selling Engineers in Five Languages? Didn’t Think So.

April 28 Is Your School Churning Out Best Selling Engineers in Five Languages? Didn’t Think So.By Dan Kadlec, Author and Journalist.

In the era of Big Data, we can’t seem to tie our own shoes without first confirming the need through statistics. Yet some things are so big and so obvious we shouldn’t wait—like, say, stopping texting while driving or rebuilding our middle class.

Do we really need data to know that distracted drivers cause accidents? Isn’t it a given that a shrinking middle class is a drag on the economy? Financial education is like that too. Can anyone really argue against teaching money basics to kids who will come of age in a world with few financial safety nets? Read more…

POSTED: April 28, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Resources

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