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Teaching Teachers the Ins and Outs of Financial Literacy


“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”  – Nelson Mandela


To fully appreciate this blog, we must first get real about the state of financial literacy in our country. 

The case for teaching teachers:

Research suggests that children begin developing attitudes and behaviors about money as young as six or seven, the same age most enter their first formal educational setting.  Surprisingly though, only 17 states require high school students to complete a course in personal finance.  According to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, 89% of teachers believe more should be done, but only 20% feel “very confident” to deliver any of the six curriculum topics surveyed.

Opportunity knocking…

In 2015, The North Carolina Council on Economic Education (Winner of the 2018 CEE Council of the Year Award) and Fidelity Investments® set out to change the narrative.  The original vision: Develop a stand-alone financial literacy professional development workshop designed to fully equip teachers with the resources needed to help students appreciate the importance of personal finance.  As the program quickly grew in popularity, so did a desire from educators to further improve their own understanding too.  Insert Jump$tatrt and their acclaimed “Financial Foundations for Educators” curriculum.  This combination of knowledge AND tools was the secret sauce for a lasting solution that continues to inspire financial futures today.  “Teacher Trainings” are now hosted in all 11 Fidelity Investments locations across the United States.

“When we can share our expertise, especially with the community, it’s an authentic way to give back and make a difference.”  – Pamela Everhart, Head of Regional Public Affairs and Community Relations, Fidelity Investments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student impact multiplier effect: 

Since inception, the program has reached more than 1,400 teachers and, in turn, 150,000+ students.

I look back at my younger self and I think about what I wish I’d known.  To be able to introduce these concepts to my students means they’re getting a jump start in life.” 

Krista Scarlett, Teacher, Goffstown High School, NH.

With more and more young people acquiring student loan debt, the need for personal finance is more dire than ever.  CEE will continue to play our part and – together with you – help combat those earlier, opportunistic statistics…one deserving student and teacher at a time.

Learn more about our mission and visit our free K-12 teacher website, EconEdLink where you can find personal finance and economic lesson plans, digital activities, videos, webinars, and more.

POSTED: October 11, 2018 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , ,

2018 Survey of the States Reveals Slow to No Growth in K-12 Personal Finance and Economic Education

Now in Its 20th Year, Council for Economic Education Study Highlights Wide Gaps in Financial and Economic Education Throughout U.S. States

 

A 2017 study from the American Psychological Association reveals that money is the second leading source of stress in the United States, and the National Institute of Mental Health estimates that 40 million Americans suffer from anxiety, which financial woes can easily trigger. Yet, according to Council for Economic Education’s (CEE) 2018 Survey of the States: Economic and Personal Finance Education in Our Nation’s Schools, financial independence may be out of reach for many because K-12 students are not receiving adequate tools and training to make informed financial decisions; only one-third of the U.S. states require high school students to take a course in personal finance, while less than half require them to take a course in economics before graduating.

Now in its 20th year, Survey of the States findings indicate that progress has been achieved, yet gains have slowed in recent years. CEE will unveil the full results at an event today at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Research shows that students in states that require financial education have higher credit scores as well as more responsible spending habits and are less prone to compulsive shopping, reducing their financial risk greatly. However, 2018 Survey of the States findings reveal:

  • The number of states that require high school students to take a course in personal finance (17) has not changed over the past four years.
  • Since 2016, there been no change in the number of states which include personal finance in their K-12 standards and require those standards to be taught.
  • 22 states require high school students to take a course in economics—less than half the country but two more states than in 2016.
  • There has been no change in the number of states that require standardized testing of economic concepts since 2014.

“When we initiated this survey in 1998, only one state required enrollment in a personal finance course while 13 required enrollment in an economics class, so clearly we’ve made some gains. Michigan, Georgia, Utah and Texas are leading the way by requiring personal finance and economics courses to be offered and taken, as well as by implementing state standards and standardized testing,” said Nan J. Morrison, President and CEO of the Council for Economic Education. “However, the majority of U.S. states are failing our students by declining to offer these fundamental courses which are critical to their financial stability and security later in life.”

CEE conducts The Survey of the States: Economic and Personal Finance Education in Our Nation’s Schools every two years. The report collects data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and includes commentary from experts and educators in the field to provide a comprehensive look into the state of K-12 economic and financial education in the United States.

The 2018 Survey of the States is available for download at: www.councilforeconed.org/surveyofthestates 

About the Council for Economic Education

The Council for Economic Education (CEE) is the leading non-profit organization in the United States that focuses on the economic and financial education of students from kindergarten through high school—and we have been doing so for nearly 70 years. We carry out our mission by educating the educators: providing the curriculum tools, the pedagogical support, and the community of peers that instruct, inspire, and guide. All resources and programs are developed by educators, and delivered by our national network of affiliates. Our goal is to reach and teach every child. Each year CEE’s programs reach more than 55,000 K-12 teachers and over 5 million students across the United States. EconEdLink – our free, online educator gateway for economic and personal finance lessons and resources – attracts more than 1 million unique visitors annually.

Media Contacts:  

Lisa Fels Davitt
lisa@successioncommunications.com
(973) 886-1917

Kate Alexander
kate@successioncommunications.com
(201) 638-3946

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POSTED: February 8, 2018 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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