College

Exciting new partnership: CEE & Kidfund

We are excited to announce we have teamed up with Kidfund to make it easier for families to save for their children’s future and college tuition. Kidfund is a socially powered savings app that lets families and friends contribute to the child’s account. The app engages the child in the process so they can understand the power of saving and watch their money grow.

This partnership is a natural extension of CEE’s mission to provide children with the knowledge and tools to create financial stability for themselves and their families. As a result of the CEE and Kidfund partnership, CEE will receive $10 for each new family that opens an account and starts to save to support its mission.

We hope you’ll sign up for your child’s free account today and/or pass along this information to others who you think can benefit from this. And, for a limited time only, families new to Kidfund will receive $5 when they sign up and start saving. The funds are held securely in individual accounts at USALLIANCE Financial. The accounts are completely free (no fee, no minimums), earn 3% interest on the first $500, and are FDIC insured up to $250,000.

To  learn more about the partnership and how to download the Kidfund app, please visit: https://www.kidfund.us/cee-partnership

 

 

POSTED: April 23, 2018 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Judy Kraus from Hyde Park Middle School on Financing for College and Beyond

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 5 of 8.

Judy Kraus from Hyde Park Middle School in Las Vegas, Nevada, gets her 7th grade pre-algebra class thinking early about their future education plans and career goals. With this year-long project, she gets her students very involved by simulating their projected finances after they graduate college and are working at their chosen entry level job. The result? Students can see how much money it takes to reach their goals and be financially prepared when the time comes.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 13th.

POSTED: August 6, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Get Financially Fit

With many money management resources at your fingertips, it can be easier than you think to teach your high school students how keep their personal finances in order. To become financially fit means for students to use their money wisely and to make conscious and informed decisions with their savings and spending.

First, many accessible online resources cHow to Get Financially Fitan help them create a budget that’s best for them and can help make it easier to stay on track with printables, apps, and email reminders. With the advent of banking and saving apps for smartphones, it’s now easier than ever for students with bank accounts to put away a small chunk into savings each time they get paid, which is important because you never know when an emergency will occur. Remind students to never forgo reading the fine print on any banking card options to avoid extra debit and credit card expenses like ATM fees, overdraft fees, or annual fees on top of the charges they already pay. Additionally, take advantage of the free online credit reports per bureau each year as your older student’s annual financial checkup to see if their credit is up to par so they can work on repairing it, if necessary.

The bottom line is that healthy finances can be easily achieved but not by accident. Online or offline, financial planning can work for your high school students now and in the future if you remind them to take mindful precautions and make thoughtful decisions with their money. Students will thank themselves for the time they spend planning because it is definitely worth the benefits of being financially fit for life.

Written by GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne, a rising junior at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina studying English and Communications. She is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 24, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Hidden Costs of College

Hidden Costs of CollegeCollege seems to have many costs everyone forgets to mention, especially at orientation. Going in, everyone has ideas what their four years will cost: tuition, room and board, and money for other essentials. Now add the fees for that prestigious fraternity/sorority that you have been eying, paying for plane tickets and everything else when you take a summer or semester abroad, and finding some fantastic internship where you realize what it is that you are going to do (or not do) with your life, which is also usually unpaid. On top of this, there’s the possibility of extra semesters because remediation, a failed class, switch of majors, or transfers and there are even costs for graduating. All this isn’t to say that college is expensive so you should skip out on it, as college graduates with a Bachelor’s Degree earn on average $800,000 more in a lifetime compared to those who don’t have degrees. This is here, however, to open your eyes to the potential costs that lay ahead of you. Hopefully this list will help you plan so you can do all that you desire to do and come out with a degree in hand, a couple years of great memories, and a little less debt.

Written by Fisher Derderian, a rising junior at The King’s College in downtown Manhattan studying Politics, Philosophy, and Economics. He is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 5, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Unique Savings to Scholarship Program Helps Prepare Students for Financial Success

April 10By Eileen Klein, President of the Arizona Board of Regents; Member of the Arizona State Board of Education.

For most students, entering college is not only a time of inauguration to new learning and discovery, but it also marks the advent of new found freedoms and responsibilities, including new levels of financial decision-making.  Yet while students may arrive at college prepared to learn, we know many are ill-equipped to be sound stewards of their financial health.

In Arizona, as we work to increase post secondary education attainment levels, we’re also finding new ways to empower students and families with the tools to help support strong financial planning and decision making.

Read more…

POSTED: April 10, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Increasing Financial Literacy to Address the Student Loan Debt Crisis

April 9

By: United States Senator Jack Reed (D-RI)

April is an exciting time for high school seniors. Graduation is just around the corner and college acceptance letters are rolling in, and with them an overwhelming sense of possibility and anticipation for students, along with a measure of joy and worry for parents.

Getting into college is an admirable achievement, but paying for college is a long-term commitment.

Indeed, according to the Project on Student Debt, 71% of college seniors who graduated last year had some form of student loans to pay back, with an average of $29,400 per borrower. Read more…

POSTED: April 9, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

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