Politics

A Call to Business Leaders

By: DAN SCHULMAN, President & CEO, PayPal 

PayPal is committed to democratizing financial services to enable all people to join and thrive in the digital economy. Whether here in the US or around the world, we believe everyone should have access to the affordable, convenient and secure financial products and services they need to improve their financial health, support their families, contribute to their communities, and invest in their futures.

But access is only part of the equation – another critical part is education. Economic and financial literacy is a foundational element to achieving financial health and needs to be included in early education programs. We have seen firsthand that improving the financial health of individuals has powerful ripple effects across families, communities, companies, and economies. And that process starts in the classroom.

Financial inclusion and financial health are problems that we can solve in our lifetimes if we truly understand the causes and challenges, and commit to partnering across the ecosystem to fix the gaps that exist in the traditional financial system. We can make a difference by forming deeper bonds between the public, private, and social sectors to develop new curriculum and educational models that foster and encourage financial literacy and understanding from an early age.

This op-ed was published in the Council for Economic Education’s 2018 Survey of the States.

POSTED: February 13, 2018 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2018 Survey of the States Reveals Slow to No Growth in K-12 Personal Finance and Economic Education

Now in Its 20th Year, Council for Economic Education Study Highlights Wide Gaps in Financial and Economic Education Throughout U.S. States

 

A 2017 study from the American Psychological Association reveals that money is the second leading source of stress in the United States, and the National Institute of Mental Health estimates that 40 million Americans suffer from anxiety, which financial woes can easily trigger. Yet, according to Council for Economic Education’s (CEE) 2018 Survey of the States: Economic and Personal Finance Education in Our Nation’s Schools, financial independence may be out of reach for many because K-12 students are not receiving adequate tools and training to make informed financial decisions; only one-third of the U.S. states require high school students to take a course in personal finance, while less than half require them to take a course in economics before graduating.

Now in its 20th year, Survey of the States findings indicate that progress has been achieved, yet gains have slowed in recent years. CEE will unveil the full results at an event today at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Research shows that students in states that require financial education have higher credit scores as well as more responsible spending habits and are less prone to compulsive shopping, reducing their financial risk greatly. However, 2018 Survey of the States findings reveal:

  • The number of states that require high school students to take a course in personal finance (17) has not changed over the past four years.
  • Since 2016, there been no change in the number of states which include personal finance in their K-12 standards and require those standards to be taught.
  • 22 states require high school students to take a course in economics—less than half the country but two more states than in 2016.
  • There has been no change in the number of states that require standardized testing of economic concepts since 2014.

“When we initiated this survey in 1998, only one state required enrollment in a personal finance course while 13 required enrollment in an economics class, so clearly we’ve made some gains. Michigan, Georgia, Utah and Texas are leading the way by requiring personal finance and economics courses to be offered and taken, as well as by implementing state standards and standardized testing,” said Nan J. Morrison, President and CEO of the Council for Economic Education. “However, the majority of U.S. states are failing our students by declining to offer these fundamental courses which are critical to their financial stability and security later in life.”

CEE conducts The Survey of the States: Economic and Personal Finance Education in Our Nation’s Schools every two years. The report collects data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and includes commentary from experts and educators in the field to provide a comprehensive look into the state of K-12 economic and financial education in the United States.

The 2018 Survey of the States is available for download at: www.councilforeconed.org/surveyofthestates 

About the Council for Economic Education

The Council for Economic Education (CEE) is the leading non-profit organization in the United States that focuses on the economic and financial education of students from kindergarten through high school—and we have been doing so for nearly 70 years. We carry out our mission by educating the educators: providing the curriculum tools, the pedagogical support, and the community of peers that instruct, inspire, and guide. All resources and programs are developed by educators, and delivered by our national network of affiliates. Our goal is to reach and teach every child. Each year CEE’s programs reach more than 55,000 K-12 teachers and over 5 million students across the United States. EconEdLink – our free, online educator gateway for economic and personal finance lessons and resources – attracts more than 1 million unique visitors annually.

Media Contacts:  

Lisa Fels Davitt
lisa@successioncommunications.com
(973) 886-1917

Kate Alexander
kate@successioncommunications.com
(201) 638-3946

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POSTED: February 8, 2018 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New Topic on EconEdLink: Election Economics

EconEdLink-1318-

The Council for Economic Education is pleased to announce the release of a series of lesson plans to help educators (grades 9-12) teach the election and economics in their economics, civics, government, and other social studies courses. The lessons are all available for free on our teacher website EconEdLink.

Topics covered include:

  • Can Election Futures Markets Be More Accurate Than Polls?
  • Voters and Elections (Who Votes and Why?)
  • Money and Elections, Economic Misery and Presidential Elections, and more

Throughout the summer, additional lessons will be added on important campaign topics as the campaign continues to unfold, and CEE will also be hosting a free webinar for teachers on how to incorporate these lessons into their classrooms.

To ensure that you receive information about upcoming webinars and new materials available on EconEdLink, you can register for free at the following URL: www.econedlink.org/register.

If you have any questions, please contact April Somboun.

POSTED: May 4, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Mayor Cory Booker supporting K-12 education in NJ

MaryB_CoryBMary Blanusa, CEE’s Vice President of Government Affairs & Partnership Projects, met Newark Mayor and US Senate hopeful, Cory Booker, at Hackensack High School in Hackensack, NJ.

Mayor Booker has stated, “K-12 education is the front line of the fight for the American dream — our elected officials, policy makers, educators, administrators, parents and students are engaged in the last great struggle to help our nation achieve herself – we all must join in this struggle for the outcome of this fight will determine our common destiny.”

POSTED: June 21, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , ,

Financial Empowerment is a Nonpartisan Message

By Congressman Rubén Hinojosa, Representing the 15th District of Texas.

In 2005, former Congresswoman Judy Biggert and I came together to form the Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus. Judy, a Republican, and myself, a Democrat, found common ground when it came to the importance of financial literacy. I am happy to report that Congressman Steve Stivers, Republican of Ohio, is our new co-chair for the Caucus. We will once again sponsor a House Resolution declaring April as Financial Literacy Month, and the annual Financial Literacy Day on Capitol Hill will be held on Friday, April 26 in the Cannon Caucus Room in Washington, D.C.

The message of the Caucus is a nonpartisan one: We need to empower young people with the information they need in order to make healthy financial decisions throughout their lives. A focus on financial literacy makes sense for policymakers from either party; financial empowerment can alleviate poverty and attack inequality, while also providing Americans the tools to be financially independent and self-reliant. This will not only ensure their families’ own financial security, but will contribute to the stability and growth of the entire economy. Read more…

POSTED: April 22, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , ,

Financial Literacy Month aimed at raising awareness to manage funds

Cory WilsonBy Cory T. Wilson, Chair-elect, Mississippi Council on Economic Education; Attorney, Heidelberg Steinberger Colmer & Burrow.

Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant has issued a proclamation designating April as Financial Literacy Month.

Chances are, I realize, the designation is probably not on your smart phone calendar, and it may not be the theme of many spring parties. But it merits attention and not just in April.

As millions of Americans endured the drudgery of filing their tax returns April 15, a few thoughts on financial literacy are in order. Of course, it takes more than a Master’s degree in finance to understand our byzantine tax code, so leave that to the accountants and the tax software folks for the moment. Financial Literacy Month is aimed at raising awareness of a problem more basic and epidemic. Read more…

POSTED: April 17, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

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