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Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School on Having a Digital Classroom

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 8 of 8.

Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School in Oakland, Maryland, has spent her career teaching economics fusing it with her other passion, immersive technology for the classroom. For her, economics lessons come alive when they are paired with the ground breaking information found on web portals and discovered with easy to use platforms such as tablets. With these tools, Ms. Bender is able to teach complementary lessons on economics and digital citizenship by showing students what tools to use and how to use them responsibly.

This completes CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education. Keep checking back for more weekly updates on our blog!

POSTED: August 27, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Teachers on Financial Fitness for Life

Tried and tested, Financial Fitness for Life® (FFFL) is the ideal personal finance curriculum for all teachers.

Stacia Reeves from Rincon High School in Arizona says, “Students don’t realize they’re incorporating economics when they are doing these activities, but they’re all jazzed when they come back the next day and realize something they did in their life was applicable to something that we did in the classroom.” With user generated course content, FFFL’s comprehensive lesson plans guides teachers through the course, making it easy to follow, especially for those that may not be well-versed in teaching economics.

What makes FFFL perfect for students is how applicable each lesson is. CEE has made each lesson a preparation for life beyond the classroom, measuring the learning by four themes of personal finance: earning an income, saving, spending and credit, and money management. Even with these four comprehensive themes that align to the Common Core State Standards, students and teachers have still found the lessons engaging. Lynda Motriam from Old Mill High School attests to the originality of the student and teacher guides, saying “FFFL gives you a chance to teach financial concepts in a very inventive way. That’s one of the things that is consistent with CEE materials…they put a fresh spin on it.”

The streamlined lesson content, updated information, and fresh online resources on these new lessons keeps K-12 students excited about learning personal finance skills in and out of the classroom while keeping teachers ready too. Make sure to check out what these fantastic teachers have to say after using the Financial Fitness for Life® textbook series in their own K–12 classrooms.

POSTED: August 26, 2014 | BY: kwilliams | TAGS: , , , , , ,

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary on Combining Music and Economics

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 7 of 8.

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary in Frederick, Maryland, incorporated singing into her classroom help her students to grasp economics concepts. By serving as an example of combining music and economics, Ms. Neely inspired students (singers and non-singers alike) to create their own individual pieces of music, using concepts they learned and implementing them their own way, proving that they understood what was taught.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 27th, 2014.

POSTED: August 20, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE in the News: NBC’s Back-to-School Money Lessons Cite Survey of the States

In NBC’s ToSharon Epperson CEE in the News: NBCs Back to School Money Lessons Cite Survey of the Statesday Online, reporter Sharon Epperson shares some great tips for teaching your kids about money just in time for the new school year — plus a great shout-out to CEE, citing the Survey of the States! Click here to read the full article.

This article was also seen in USA Today.

POSTED: August 18, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , ,

Lynda Motiram from Old Mill High School on Using Graph Relay Races

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 6 of 8.

Lynda Motiram from Old Mill High School in Millersville, Maryland, adopted graph relays as a classroom activity that quickly became a favorite tool for reinforcing economic concepts. Ms. Motiram recommends this easy-preparation activity to keep your class engaged by working and collaborating in group and using board work to reinforce the lessons. For Ms. Motiram, one of the best outcomes is seeing students that are struggling with the lecture grasp the concepts when using the graph relay.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 20th.

POSTED: August 13, 2014 | BY: GeorgiAnna Carbone-Wynne | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE Board Member, Annamaria Lusardi, Integral on PISA Results

2013 conference speaker annamaria lusardi CEE Board Member, Annamaria Lusardi, Integral on PISA ResultsLast month, the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) presented the highly anticipated results of a worldwide study on financial literacy education, thanks in large part to the efforts of CEE Board Member Annamaria Lusardi. PISA tested 15-year-old students from 18 countries, comparing financial literacy performance on a global scale to help identify effective national strategies and best practices. Click here to see presentation and discussion of its key findings.

Despite modest progress in implementing financial education over the past few years, American students performed squarely in the middle of the pack, far behind nations like China and and Belgium. But on the bright side, these results have helped shine a spotlight on the need for improvement: Associated Press and others have cited data from the Survey of the States as an important indicator and benchmark for progress. Click here to view some of the highlights.

POSTED: August 6, 2014 | BY: kwilliams | TAGS: , , , , ,

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